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Posts tagged ‘Customer Value’

28
Apr

Greatness is not rare: Nike creates emotional connection with customers

“Greatness is not some rare DNA Strand. It’s not some precious thing. Greatness is no more unique to us than breathing. We are capable of it. All of us.” Yes, it is an ad from NIKE which value the greatness from normal people and encourage customers to conquer themselves and reach a certain personal goal.

The ad is telling a story about a boy called Nathan who weighed 232 pounds at the time but lose 30 pounds in six month using healthy and scientific methods. However at when the ads was launched some criticized the ad and said NIKE takes use of the boy and gain sympathy. From my perspective, the ad is cheerful and use emotional connection to encourage customers to chase dream and conquer themselves. Overweight and losing weight has become a heated issue in current society and most of people feel unconfident and lose hope in the situation. However NIKE create internal value for customers by creating confidence and courage in the products.

The greatness can help people find dream, gain respect and get confidence. Nike always does great job by using emotional connection with customers and establish positive brand image.

 

Read more about NIKE ads at:

http://www.brandchannel.com/home/post/2013/04/26/All-The-News-You-Can-Drink-042613.aspx

18
Mar

Building Customer Communities Is the Key to Creating Value

This is an interesting article about how to use customers to create value for company. It is very true that peer’s recommendation is far more effective than advertisement in persuading us to buy products. But the question is: how to take advantage of these peer influences?

 

To answer the above question, the author first divides customer-company relationship into 4 levels. The first level is that buyers perceive you as the supplier of a commodity. In this level, customers do not think your products are better than others, and there is no emotional association. The second level is that buyers perceive you as helping them get a job done, which means in some ways you make your products stand out, and the basic emotional connection is built. At Level 3, you engage the customer emotionally, which strengthens loyalty and retention. However, this relationship can fade over time, so companies need to move to next level. At Level 4, you’re helping customers build their social capital — that is, helping them to build and expand valuable support groups and communities. And then, the author lists some specific ways that can help companies to reach level 4.

 

I think most successful company today only reach and stay at level 3. They have loyal customers and some customers may recommend the products voluntarily. But it does not mean that the company has already made full use of its loyal customers. If those successful companies can reach level 4, they will be more successful. 

 

http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/02/building_customer_communities.html

18
Mar

Fun is the primary ingredient in kitchen: NOLA School of Cooking experience

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I had a great day in New Orleans this spring break enjoying original jazz music, artist galleries and, of course, the fantastic cuisine there! Most Creole and Cajun restaurants are boasting delicious food and wonderful service but only the New Orleans School of Cooking gave me the most impressive experience, which focus on customer experience management by integrating multiple business platforms and channels.

The special cooking school provides entertaining classes by teaching the basics of Louisiana cooking. When we stepped into the store ten minutes earlier for our class, the shop assistants warmly welcome us by providing sample Pralines and showing the cooking shop around, which made the waiting time not bored. Then class began, the chef teacher is really funny and the whole class is full of laughing. During the class chef had a really good interaction with class by tasting food and answering questions. After the class, all the customers flooded into the cooking shop, which carry a full line of Cajun and Creole products, cookbooks, spices, gift baskets, cookware as well as the most famous seasoning called Joe’s Stuff. Moreover they provide shipping service to any place around US.

 I not a cooking lover but the experience made me fell into love with cooking because I found the most important ingredient: Fun. The NOCS integrates multiple channels: customers can reserve class and shopping online and require customized such as one by one teaching and special day for Valentines etc. They never hard sell product but turn the products into a kind of experience and enable customers to find fun during the process.

 

Click here to explore more fun of New Orleans School of Cooking:

http://www.neworleansschoolofcooking.com/

 

14
Feb

Monster create a emotional connection with potential customers

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“I love my job.” That’s what most people attempt to convince themselves. However, in the reality, most people lie to themselves and don’t love their current jobs at all. The commercial launched by Monster used Pinocchio’s dilemma to reveal the social phenomena and create an emotional connection with the potential customers by digging the true feelings from their heart. The commercial is impressive because it successfully explore the demand of the potential market and show “empathy” to customers. Monster answered the question from customers: “Why should we purchase your offering?” Because Monster puts itself in customers’ shoes and provide the service to help customer not simply find a job, but provide a opportunity to get a graceful job which can help customer no longer fool themselves any more.

Click here to find the commercial: http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/ad-day-monster-147225

 

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